Study

Study highlights the importance of routine suicide risk screenings in children with ASD

Study highlights the importance of routine suicide risk screenings in children with ASD

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are twice as likely to report suicidal thoughts when screened for suicidal ideation during routine medical assessments, according to new research from the Kennedy Krieger Institute. The study, which was published in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, highlights the importance of implementing suicide risk screenings as part …

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Stem cells lose their 'glue' and escape from hair follicle to cause hair loss, says new study

Stem cells lose their ‘glue’ and escape from hair follicle to cause hair loss, says new study

Strand of human hair at 200x magnification. Credit: Jan Homann/Wikipedia A newly discovered cause of balding in aging male mice could reveal a cause of hair loss in men and women as well, reports a study from Northwestern Medicine scientists. The findings provide new insight into how hair and tissues age. The study, published in …

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Horse hyperimmune antibody may help the fight against COVID-19, study finds

Horse hyperimmune antibody may help the fight against COVID-19, study finds

by Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Biologia Estrutural e Bioimagem (INBEB) Trimeric spike glycoprotein induces high level of horse neutralizing antibodies. Credit: Guilherme de Oliveira A study conducted by a consortium of Brazilian researchers has demonstrated that a hyperimmune serum consisting of purified antibody fragments produced in horses may be an efficient approach …

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Study finds genetic markers may predict severity of COVID-19 infection

Study finds genetic markers may predict severity of COVID-19 infection

Creative rendition of SARS-CoV-2 particles (not to scale). Credit: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH Scientists at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, along with colleagues at UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital, have discovered specific genetic biomarkers that not only show who is infected with COVID-19, but offer insights into how severe …

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Study: Variations in cell-surface ACE2 levels alter direct binding of SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein and viral infectivity: Implications for measuring Spike protein interactions with animal ACE2 orthologs. Image Credit: Kateryna Kon/ Shutterstock

Study finds SARS-CoV-2 infection is proportional to cell surface ACE2 levels

Even as the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic was unfolding, there was already evidence suggesting that the disease was zoonotic in origin. One theory that gained particular media attention was the likelihood of transmission from wild bats, potentially sold in the wet market in Wuhan, China. Study: Variations in cell-surface ACE2 levels alter direct binding …

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Study identifies Sars-CoV-2 variant with a deletion in its genome

Study identifies Sars-CoV-2 variant with a deletion in its genome

Geneticist Prof. Dr Jörn Kalinowski and his team at the Center for Biotechnology are using the latest nanopore sequencing to sequence the longest possible gene segments and identify deletions in the genome of Sars-CoV-2 variants. Credit: Bielefeld University Automated gene analyses of SARS-CoV-2 samples consistently miss gene segments in the virus genome that have undergone …

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Antibiotics for appendicitis: CODA study findings finalized

Antibiotics for appendicitis: CODA study findings finalized

Credit: CC0 Public Domain Antibiotics are now an accepted first-line treatment for most people with appendicitis, according to final results of the Comparing Outcomes of antibiotic Drugs and Appendectomy (CODA) trial, and an updated treatment guideline for appendicitis from the American College of Surgeons. The CODA study findings were to be reported Monday, Oct. 26, …

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Deterioration of brain cells in Parkinson's disease is slowed by blocking the Bach1 protein, preclinical study shows

Deterioration of brain cells in Parkinson’s disease is slowed by blocking the Bach1 protein, preclinical study shows

Dopamine producing brain cells (stained brown) were protected with HPPE (right panels) in neurotoxin-based PD model (MPTP; bottom) compared to vehicle control cells (left panels). Credit: Dr. Bobby Thomas from the Medical University of South Carolina. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, afflicting more than 10 million people worldwide and more …

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Infection with COVID carries much higher risk of developing neurological complications than vaccine, says new study

Infection with COVID carries much higher risk of developing neurological complications than vaccine, says new study

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain COVID-19 is more likely to cause very rare neurological events than vaccines, according to a new study involving experts from the University of Nottingham. The findings of the study, led by the University of Oxford, are published today in Nature Medicine. Researchers from across the UK reported on the risks of …

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Prior authorization costs radiation oncology clinics more than $40 million each year, study estimates

Prior authorization costs radiation oncology clinics more than $40 million each year, study estimates

Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain The time required to secure prior authorization approvals for radiation therapy treatments equates to a financial impact of more than $40 million annually for academic medical centers, according to a new study. Findings will be presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting. Prior authorization is a …

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